Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)

This information is useful for adults and older adults
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)
Why Yale Medicine?
  • Yale Medicine’s MDA-ALS/Motor Neuron Disease Clinic is one of just 42 centers certified by the Muscular Dystrophy Association.
  • The clinic is also part of the Northeast ALS Consortium, a group that helps patients enroll in clinical trials for promising new treatments.
  • For patients with end-stage ALS who are not able to travel, a Yale Medicine physician makes visits to patients’ homes to continue the high quality care.

Before baseball player Lou Gehrig was diagnosed in 1939, few Americans knew about Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), the neurodegenerative disease which causes progressive muscle weakness and paralysis. While commonly found in people in their 50s, it affects between 5,000 to 6,000 patients per year in the United States, regardless of ethnicity or sex (however, men are more likely to get the disease than women). In the overwhelming majority of cases, there is no known cause.

While there is no cure for ALS, patients treated at a dedicated ALS center such as Yale Medicine’s will have a better chance of living beyond the average life expectancy of three to four years. Yale Medicine’s MDA-ALS/Motor Neuron Disease Clinic is one of 42 centers certified by the Muscular Dystrophy Association and part of the Northeast ALS Consortium, which helps patients enroll in clinical trials for promising treatments.


Clinical Trials

New treatments for many conditions are tested in clinical trials, which ultimately bring lifesaving new drugs and devices to the patients who need them most. By participating in a clinical trial, you may get access to the most advanced treatments for your condition, and help determine their benefits for future patients.